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Thursday, June 02, 2005


Mark Felt, the alleged "Deep Throat", may have been a dubious "hero" and/or an insincere whistleblower, and may have been a knowing pawn to bring one corporate mafia don down in the form of President Richard Nixon in order to replace him with another corporate mafia don as president; but, aside from all of the questions that Mark Felt's allegedly being "Deep Throat" and coming forward now to allegedly admit it understandably bring up, such as it actually being used to make a completely corrupt U.S. government supposedly look good because "doing the right thing" in such ways is allegedly done by U.S. government agencies and/or its agents, what "Deep Throat" did WAS right even if the motives for doing so are suspect and probably are other than completely, if at all, altruistic.

Therefore, today I bring you what the great whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, who as a U.S. government employee released the Pentagon Papers in 1973 blowing the lid off the fraud of the Vietnam war and thereby was a primary factor in bringing an end to the war two years later, and thereby was a true hero, has to say about Felt's coming forward and what "Deep Throat" did and had to say back at the time of Watergate; and I take this opportunity to let you know that such revelations and what they truly stand for, standing up for what's right and revealing the truth about great lies and very dangerous, extremely harmful, mass-murderous treacheries are one of the primary reasons for what my life is now all about, why I stand for what I stand for (nothing but the truth and helping to spread the truth to more people), why I have the websites and blogs that I do, and one of the primary reasons that I write what I write and/or post such insightful thoughts of others' on my websites and blogs:


DANIEL ELLSBERG'S THOUGHTS ON
MARK FELT'S REVELATION(S)

From Daniel Ellsberg's Website, at:
"http://www.Ellsberg.Net/"
(Posted on his website on 1 June 2005)
[Copyright (c) 2005 in the U.S.A. and
Internationally by Ellsberg.Net and/or
Daniel Ellsberg. All rights reserved.]



MAY 31, 2005 - Former FBI official Mark Felt has revealed himself as Woodward and Bernstein's source Deep Throat:


Comments by Daniel Ellsberg on Salon.com: ( http://www.Salon.com/news/ feature/2005/06/01/DT_reax )

"Felt was one of a dozen people who had access to information that the White House was lying. I'd like each of those [other] people to ask themselves why they weren't Deep Throat, how they justified not sharing that information with the world. We desperately need more Mark Felts right now, and we needed them back in 1964. He played an important part in holding the government accountable, and should receive an honorary Nobel Prize. At the same time, I think he has lots more to tell, and I hope he tells it."


###
Edited comments by Daniel Ellsberg on the Pat Thurston Show, KSRO, Santa Rosa, CA:

ELLSBERG: "Mark Felt understandably felt a conflict of loyalties here, to his secrecy oath, his agency, and to the president on one hand, and on the other hand, to the Constitution, which is what he and I had taken an oath to. We don't take an oath to a commander-in-chief, we take an oath to uphold the Constitution in this country. That was clearly being violated by the president, who could not be held accountable without an insider like Felt revealing what he knew.

"So, I'm very glad he did it, he did the right thing, and I'd like to see him get a Pulitzer Prize from the journalistic profession."

THURSTON: "There's a good possibility that there are members of his family that are listening to us as we speak right now, since he's a member of our community. He may be listening himself."

ELLSBERG: "I want to congratulate him and thank him. I think he's a hero. I think he acted courageously, and rightly, and I do understand that he has mixed feelings about that, even now, because it's clear from the Vanity Fair article that he still has great loyalty to his agency, the FBI, and to his service, and probably to other presidents that he served. But he was right in realizing that his loyalty to the Constitution and the country overrode his loyalty to a president who was abusing his office. So I want to thank him."


###
Edited comments by Daniel Ellsberg on KPIX TV, San Francisco:

ELLSBERG: "I am very glad that Mark Felt has revealed himself, and I hope he is in an emotional state and mental state that he can tell us a lot more now, about what led him to do it, how he did it, and what else he knew. I'm sure he has a lot else to tell us. I had always hoped that the person who did this would reveal himself while he was still alive, and that other whistleblowers would do the same, in order to take responsibility for what they did, and let people see them, and see that they did it for honorable, patriotic, courageous reasons, and encourage other people to do it."

HANK PLANTE: "Felt seems conflicted in the article. He seems like he's ashamed, and he doesn't want to bring dishonor on his family for having revealed secrets. His family is saying "You're a hero." What's it like to be a whistleblower?"

ELLSBERG: "Virtually every whistleblower--we're talking about insiders who have made unauthorized disclosures of things that their bosses, their agency, their president doesn't want known, because those things are embarrassing--these are all people who signed oaths that they would not reveal information. They signed them, of course, not knowing exactly what crimes they would be called on to conceal as a result of that.

"So all of them--myself included--feel at some point a conflict of loyalty: a loyalty to their boss, to their team, to their promise, and on the other hand, a loyalty to the Constitution, which is actually what we civilians were sworn to uphold. We didn't swear an oath to uphold the führer, in effect, or the secretary general, or the president. We swore an oath to uphold the Constitution. And when the president is clearly violating the Constitution, by deceiving congress on reasons for going to war, or he's clearly violating his oath to uphold the law, as Nixon was doing, what is your highest loyalty?

"Clearly, Felt acted, ultimately, on what he felt was his highest loyalty to the Constitution, and to the country. And I think he was right. But that doesn't relieve him from a gnawing sense that he's breaking a promise, that he's letting down a team. He clearly still respects the FBI, and wishes them well, and doesn't like to embarrass them.

"But when their boss, the president, is embarrassing the country by violating the law, or, as in my case, getting us into a wrongful war--and I would say that applies to the current president--then I think people who know that, and who have documents, should realize that their highest loyalty is to this country, or in the case of a war, to our troops in the field, who are not being well-served by keeping secrets about their having wrongfully been sent there."








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